Little Louis’ Oyster Bar, Moncton, New Brunswick

Little Louis’ Oyster Bar dedicates its menu to stylishly celebrating the food life of the region. Tucked up a set of stairs on the second floor, this warm and inviting dining room is absolute proof that a climb doesn’t keep hungry (and wise) diners away.  There you’ll find a wine list worthy of the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence and a chef who could be at home in any fine restaurant in the nation.  The name, Little Louis’, is in honour of Louis Joseph Robichaud, (1925 – 2005), who served as Premier of New Brunswick from 1960 to 1970.  He was a short, apparently memorable, man. 

Chef Pierre Richard was born and raised in Moncton where he learned to love great food in his mother’s kitchen and in her garden. That garden’s harvest became an artists palate for Pierre in the family kitchen and that was his first real cooking gig when he was put in charge of creating an array of family meals every week.  Then a case of practical wanderlust struck and he headed west to work and learn and study.  He spent time at CrazyWeed Cafe in Canmore, studied at S.A.I.T. and when he graduated with his Red Seal certification returned to New Brunwsick to work with Chef Axel Begner, one of a handful of classically-trained chefs in New Brunswick. 

Like his friend Michel Savoie, Pierre’s menus reflect his training, his joy of great flavours and his pride of place.  There are copious amounts of fresh oysters and for those who prefer them cooked, he tops them with ‘Rockefeller’ herbs, spinach, a bit of double smoked bacon, a sprinkle of anise-scented Pastis. When they’re in season, he’ll marinate the tiniest fillets of smelts (eperlan) and serve them atop of the greens he buys at the Dieppe Market. There may be seared foie gras with apple and cranberry and balsamic or he may poach Atlantic halibut in olive oil, a timeless technique that ensures a perfectly cooked fish, then serves it with squid ink tagliatelle , almond butter, sweet chilies and tangy gremolata.  His pappardelle are handmade and topped with butter poached lobster.  Venison is seared in cocoa butter before being served with a wild blueberry sauce.  One dish we loved on a recent visit was his version of the ploye — a small stack of buckwheat pancakes topped with sturgeon mousse and a generous spoonful of Acadian caviar.

Little Louis’ Oyster Bar is one of about 250 restaurants that celebrate Food Day across Canada. Contact them at the number below.

Little Louis’ Oyster Bar est l’un des 250 restaurants à travers tout le Canada qui participent au Journée des terroirs . 

245 Collishaw Street, 2nd floor,
Moncton, New Brunswick E1C 9P9
T: 506-855-2022

www.littlelouis.ca 

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