Amy Proulx of Ontario, Canada

It’s quite amazing how fast the scrap metal collectors work these days. In less than ten minutes, the decrepit barbecue went from the garage, to the curb, to the back of a scrap collector’s van. Here’s to recycling, but what to do?

Agh! How and what and where shall we cook? Having just moved from an apartment to a house on August 1, our entire kitchen is in boxes, our fridge is empty, our energy is sapped. We could improvise any number of grand schemes, if we had the energy and the supplies.

We can instead dream about our favorite barbecues of the past. We can instead scheme up our next plan….

The whole 150lb rotisseried sheep, prepared Iranian-style, start to finish (complete with boiled trotters!) by my husband and his friend…

The fresh caught lake trout, wrapped in a wet newspaper, and grilled, with corn, potatoes, garden salad, and tarte au fraises des bois in the Gaspesie…

First summer Moroccan style tagine, with the first tomatoes, peppers and fava beans, cooked over charcoal…

A bucket of fresh mussels boiled over a campfire in a tin can, along with a generous amount of beer (!!!) on the shore of Baie Ste. Marie…

Our barbecue in Moosonee with moose stew and bannock, made oh so complete with a pizza delivery canoe…
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Today, we will be lucky to prepare a meal at all. We are completely with all the barbecuers in spirit, and will raise our glasses to the air with you. Perhaps we will have some fresh bread from the Iranian bakery down the street. Some cheese, some peaches, and of course a beer, or two from our favorite Toronto craft brewers (or let’s not count how many beer until we see how the unpacking goes!!)

We shall survive, we shall celebrate with a belated barbecue (to thank the volunteer movers) and we shall celebrate local as much as we can, not just one day a year. Isn’t that the real idea after all? Eat and savour local flavour any day and every day.

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